HONOLULU (AP) -- A group of Hawaii fishermen is asking the federal government to remove northern Pacific humpback whales from the endangered species list, saying the population has steadily grown since the international community banned commercial whaling nearly 50 years ago.

Hawaii Fishermen's Alliance for Conservation and Tradition Inc., a coalition of fishing clubs and groups from across the islands, filed a petition to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration last month.

There are more than 21,000 humpback whales in the North Pacific today, compared with about 1,400 in the mid-1960s.

More than half spend the winter breeding and calving in Hawaii's warm waters. The animals, known for acrobatic leaps and complex singing patterns, have become a major draw for tourists and support a thriving whale-watching industry in Hawaii. Other North Pacific humpbacks winter off Mexico, Central America, Japan and the Philippines.

In the summer, they migrate to feed on krill and fish in waters off Alaska, Canada and Russia.

The commercial whaling ban and other regulations would continue to protect the whales even if they were to lose their endangered status, the petition said. Though some whales die each year after being hit by ships and getting accidentally caught in fishing gear, the petition argues these accidents haven't interfered with the overall population's growth.

The fishermen are asking NOAA to first declare the North Pacific whales a distinct population. If the agency does so, the coalition wants NOAA to then remove this population from the endangered list. Humpbacks are found around the world -- globally they number about 60,000 -- but the petition is seeking delisting for whales only in the North Pacific.

Philip Fernandez, the coalition's president, said the fishermen stepped forward on the issue after watching other groups petition to add many more species to the endangered list. The government should consider humpback whales for removal to maintain a balance, Fernandez said.

"You cannot add species after species after species without evaluating whether there are species that should come off," the West Hawaii fisherman told The Associated Press by telephone from Kailua-Kona on Hawaii's Big Island.

Fishermen are concerned the integrity of the Endangered Species Act is being undermined when species are added to the list but not removed, Fernandez said.

A delisting wouldn't make it easier for fishermen to fish because the law's protections for the whales don't interfere with fishing activities, he said.

Angela Somma, NOAA Fisheries endangered species division chief, said the petition is the first seeking to delist humpback whales since the animals were classified as endangered in 1970.

The law gives the agency until mid-July to determine whether the petition merits consideration. If NOAA finds the petition has merit, the agency must come to a conclusion by mid-April.

NOAA last removed a species from the endangered list in 2008, when it determined the Caribbean monk seal had gone extinct. The last time a species' recovery prompted delisting was in 1994, when the agency removed the eastern North Pacific population of gray whales from the list.