It used to be a big deal when movies premiered on home video and in theaters the same day. Now they’re hitting home video first, sometimes weeks in advance. You’ll find some examples in the list below. All titles are available on all cable and satellite systems.

n "The One I Love" (Aug. 1)

This romantic comedy with Elisabeth Moss and Mark Duplass packs a high-concept twist that critics are being careful not to spoil. Let’s just say reviews have been strong, and this is surely the first time Duplass has been called "spectacular" by Variety. Arrives in theaters Aug. 22.

n "Locke" (Aug. 12)

Tom Hardy ("Inception") plays a working-class bloke on a fateful drive to London, and he’s the only actor you’ll see in the entire film. If you’re not familiar with his singular genius, start here.

n "Fading Gigolo" (Aug. 19)

In a rare break from making his own movies, Woody Allen plays a nebbish who pimps out his shy best friend (writer-director John Turturro). It’s terribly uneven but worth seeing for Allen, who hasn’t been this funny, charming and likable in years.

n "Blended" (Aug. 26)

A family rom-com starring Adam Sandler and Drew Barrymore. You may be wondering: Is it atrocious, or merely bad? Actually, it’s OK, thanks to its two charming stars as single parents reluctantly falling in love. Manage your expectations.

n "The Two Faces of January" (Aug. 28)

Based solely on the credits, this could be a winner.


Advertisement

Oscar Isaac ("Inside Llewyn Davis") plays a con man who becomes entangled with an attractive couple (Kirsten Dunst and Viggo Mortensen). It’s adapted from the novel by Patricia Highsmith ("The Talented Mr. Ripley"). Arrives in theaters Sept. 26.

n "Draft Day" (Aug. 29)

Kevin Costner plays a football manager trying to cattle-trade his way to a winning team without losing his integrity. The surprise is that Ivan Reitman ("Ghostbusters") directs the holy heck out of this thing, transforming a squishy sports story into a fast-moving, visually inventive comedy-drama. Though not exactly a winner, the movie sure leaves it all on the field.