Saturday October 6, 2012

The desire to find work in America has taken over our economic thought process. Jobs, jobs, and more jobs are the cry for today. In this region of the Berkshires, capable sales people are looking to get jobs. On the other hand, engineers in this area are keeping seats warm with MBA degrees.

Without sales, all we have are MBA engineers who must sit around and wait until the next work order is delivered. We need to bring trained sales people into existence and sell products that get our economy back in motion.

The American MBA program is over 50 years old and has lost its wings and wheels. Today our dutiful engineer has pigeonholed our economy into an unreal sense of neutrality that fits into a shoebox. Without global risk management and mapping of new barter economies, the engineer has stopped the engine.

Sales, on the other hand, are omnipotent. Sales have the expanded life created by an almighty algorithm called desire and it is driven by the foundation of the universe, called urgency. Companies need powerful teams to sell products and gain funding by the highest volumes globally.

In 2010, I participated in the Medica in Germany where medical devices are presented every year. The average international company at Medica was recovering well from the economic collapse and active in presenting innovations for 2011. I met global drivers that shifted back to focus on sales now more than ever. They see the timing for sales is during these recessionary times.


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For the U.S. however, our cry for "we want more jobs" is forgetting that what we need is more sales. The power of sales, even in the Berkshires, can still be found in the success of businesses such as Oak and Spruce Resort in Lee. These businesses have been driven by sales programs that continue to dig deeper than the Internet and find people that can sell. The reality is that America needs to stand up for sales now more than ever. No other economy has felt the positive impact of sales longer than America around the world. We need to give wings and wheels to the salesman again. Our economy cannot forget what it means to sell.

The final answer is right under our nose: The creation of enthusiasm. Enthusiasm is the key to our economic recovery and finally gives substance to our next president.

MARK EARL DALLMEYER

Pittsfield