Monday December 3, 2012

According to the Nov. 27 op-ed column "Don’t forget to write or call" by Michelle Gillett, more people use email and texting rather than calling or associating with a person face-to-face. When you are texting or IMing you never can express emotions, she writes, and to most people it’s more convenient for them then actually taking time out of their day to actually call someone. Also it states how texting is much easier to end a relationship, because you don’t have to hear the person’s response.

I feel the same way, I think texting and iming hide emotions and can turn you anti-social. If I didn’t have the technology we have now, I think I would be more social than I am today. I don’t like calling people unless I have to because it takes too much time, and some people keep me on the phone for hours. Texting just gets out what you need to say and its quick.

Sometimes texting isn’t good because it can give the other person on the other phone false emotions (mad, sad, happy) or can make you come across as being rude. You also wouldn’t say half the things you say texting face-to-face. As an example from the column, "How much more convenient to write, ‘It’s over,’ than to tell someone to his/her face that you never want to see them again." It also gives people the easy way out, by being lazy. -- 160 character text messages and using abbreviated words and sentences lacking punctuation? I am also guilty of that.


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Instead of spelling out the whole word "because" people sometimes put "bc" "cause" "cuz" etc. They use shortcuts because they are too lazy to spell out the whole word. If you get to used to spelling the words like that, I may come to school and write it in one of my papers not realizing it.

Those are some of the reasons why texting can give you bad punctuation/grammar.

Texting, emailing, IMing are all nice to have and can come in good use sometimes, but it does give you some bad habits.

MICHELLE GINGRAS

Pittsfield