To the editor of THE EAGLE:

On Wednesday night, June 4, the citizens of Richmond filled the Consolidated School Auditorium to overflowing to hear a comprehensive presentation on the 36 inch pipeline to carry fracked gas from Pennsylvania shale deposits through Massachusetts from Richmond to Dracut. The two hours of questions and commentary from the audience were not only about the consequences of the project for the community, the climate, and the land but also about how to stop it.

The people in Richmond and in towns along the pipeline route throughout the length of the state are not courageously resisting the pipeline simply to remove the danger of fracked oil from their "backyard." Rather what's emerging from this story and in thousands of places in Massachusetts and around the world concerns the growing sense of the need to bond together in mutual responsibility to care for the land, the air, and the water of the whole earth.

In her poem "Beginners," Denise Levertov speaks of the possible moral-spiritual awakening referred to in the previous paragraph: "...we have only begun to love the earth. We have only begun to know the power that is in us if we would join our solitudes in the communion of struggle."

SAMUEL W. SMITH

Williamstown