To the editor of THE EAGLE:

It is with great sadness and concern that I contemplate the future of BMC in light of the loss of the surgical residency program, one that has fostered the careers of many outstanding surgeons I’ve had the privilege to work with, including Dr. Parvis Sadighi.

Much of the administrations’ public statements appear to focus on why no one was to blame -- they were blindsided, shocked, taken unaware, etc. But such a drastic ruling doesn’t occur without warning, though the particulars remain unknown to us. It doesn’t matter if it was clinical or clerical.

Isn’t it someone’s job to know? Is there no responsibility or accountability here? Where does the buck stop?

The surgical residents were the "eyes and ears" of the attending surgeons. Within days, 14 sets of those eyes and ears were gone. On Friday, June 27, the last surgical resident in CCU said a tearful goodbye, and BMC had no contingency plan in place. By 3 p.m., a skeleton coverage chart appeared, with no policies to cover the Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners, particularly in CCU -- and yes, there is a difference, and yes, it matters.

Why was there not a Plan B in place in the event of loss of the appeal? The surgical staff have shown incredible dedication to provide care for our surgical patients. Drs. Joseph Pfeiffer, Michael DiSienna, David Nye, and Blair Baldwin, in particular, have exceeded expectations in their professionalism and time commitments.

There are so many questions: What about trauma services? Our lone neurosurgeon leaves in August, and I know of no plan to replace her. How are surgeons to be recruited and retained in the future? What if the application to restart the program in 2015 is denied?

I write this not only as a nurse at BMC for 30 years, but as a concerned member of the community. This is where I get my health care. This is where those I love get theirs. I think we deserve answers. I know we need our confidence restored.

ALEXANDRA HUBER

Lenox