Dangers of a billionaire presidential candidate

To the editor:

Most of us feel lucky to live in a free society but people are becoming aware and shocked at the diminishing of the middle class and the rise of a billionaire class. Oxfam reports that "62 of the world's richest billionaires are as wealthy as half of the world's population." I had to read that three times to believe it.

I never thought a person could buy the presidency, but the USA alone has 445 billionaires and the Koch brothers vowed to spend close to $900 million to influence the 2016 presidential race. There is a growing bias against this billionaire class although I believe that most billionaires earned their fortune by their own smarts and sweat equity.

Donald Trump is using part of his $10 billion fortune to run for the presidency. His grandparents were European immigrants and his father was in real estate. Trump has worked hard for his money and brand. He has the right to use it any way he wants.

He owns five lavish estates besides his three-level penthouse in New York City, the interior of which "resembles the Palace of Versailles," and if sold today he would ask $100 million. He also owns 40 upscale apartments in Manhattan that he rents out. He has a "palace" in Palm Beach worth $250 million, plus three other huge estates and a mansion on Rodeo Drive, Ca. Would the White House be good enough for him?


Once in a while, I watched Trump's TV show "The Apprentice." He handled himself professionally, respectfully and helpfully. This is not the Trump we see on the presidential debates who is hypersensitive to criticism, brash, accusatory, and cruelly demeaning of others.

This can happen if a billionaire seeks to buy the presidency of the United States.

Elna Nugent, Lenox