Trump is preferable to more of Clintons

To the editor:

In his May 16 letter "Trump poses threat to our democracy," Benjamin Glick provided a litany of perceived Trump shortcomings and rails against his lack of experience. True, Trump does not possess the customary political experience that has over the last decade brought us the rise of ISIS, Russia's incursion into Ukraine and annexation of Crimea, governmental gridlock, stagnant wages, and a widening economic gap between rich and poor.

I believe it was Einstein who said that insanity was doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result. Hillary Clinton states that she is planning to continue Obama's policies. In light of that, perhaps it is time for the public to consider a different type of "experience" in trying to solve our country's problems rather than mindlessly embracing the status quo.

Mr. Glick states that Trump "thinks that he can dictate terms to our adversaries." Now wouldn't that be refreshing to have someone tell Putin or Assad something and mean it rather than to draw Obamaesque "red lines in the sand" and then do nothing when they are violated?

Mr. Glick describes Trump as "woman-degrading," yet I am unaware of any formal accusations of rape, fondling and harassment being brought against Trump like those brought by the likes of Juanita Broaddrick, Kathleen Willey, Paula Jones and Jennifer Flowers (have I missed anyone? Oh yes, Monica Lewinsky) against that liberal icon, Bill Clinton. Bill was enabled by none other than Democratic frontrunner Hillary in their joint attempts at tamping down these "bimbo eruptions."


As to Trump's "not understanding our Constitution," our current president and law professor seems not to care that there is a Congress and has chosen to legislate through executive order. Is that showing respect for the constitutional separation of powers?

Finally, as to Trump's politically incorrect language, it is a relief for this writer not to have to agonize over Bill Clinton's incessant parsing of words by not having to figure out the meaning of such double-speak as "it all depends what the meaning of 'is' is."

Mark Merritt, Pittsfield