Loss of tax-free holiday hurts Berkshire businesses

To the editor:

Gov. Baker has enough money in his budget to go to a Governors Association conference in Des Moines, Iowa. Legislators make sure they get all their perks. There is always enough money to fund the MBTA, even though it refuses to open its books. State agencies seldom make sacrifices and when there is a snow emergency, workers don't even have to show up to the office and still get paid.

The Legislature, however, is not going to allow a tax-free holiday weekend in August because the commonwealth can't afford to lose the $25 million in sales taxes. Border states have sales tax-free weeks.

The Legislature continues to fund obsolete state relics like the three registers of deeds offices in Berkshire County, while Suffolk County, Boston, has but one who works part-time, but when legislators have a chance to help small businesses, well, someone has to make a sacrifice. It won't be the politicians who hang out on Beacon Hill however.

So when business is slow in August, your numbers are down, and money is short, remember your elected state representatives and senators and how they follow the Democratic Party line instead of looking out for the biggest industry left in Berkshire County, the tourist industry, run and owned by local business people and who employ local citizens. The days of Sprague Electric, General Electric and the paper mills are gone.


Advertisement

Sadly, representatives like Sidney Curtis, Jack Fitzpatrick and Dennis Duffin are gone and we are stuck with five people who are just sheeple for the east of 495 crowd in the State House.

Christine Canning (Republican candidate for state Senate from Western Massachusetts) would never go along with this major slight on Berkshire businesses. Think about being slighted again by the Legislature when you go to the polls on Nov. 8.

It is time for Berkshire County to be represented in Boston for a change. It is time for the public to be served by our public servants and not the public servants to be served by the citizens.

Patrick Fennell, Great Barrington