PITTSFIELD — Five months after closing one of its laboratories in Pittsfield, Nuclea Biotechnologies has moved its tech center out of the Pittsfield Economic Development Authority's administration building on Kellogg Street.

Nuclea vacated the space, which it had sublet from PEDA since November 2012, at the end of April, according to PEDA's Executive Director Cory Thurston. PEDA leases its administration building from General Electric.

The move is one of several that Nuclea has undergone since the company began reorganizing in January, one month after the board of directors replaced company founder Patrick J. Muraca as CEO with biotech industry veteran Donald J. Pogorzelski.

Pogorzelski's name is no longer listed on Nuclea's website. The company has also moved its headquarters from Pittsfield to Cambridge.

Thurston believes Nuclea moved the equipment associated with its Bioinformatics & Imaging Center on Kellogg Street to its other Pittsfield location on Elm Street. But Nuclea officials did not return a telephone call seeking comment.

Nuclea's current agreement to sublet space in PEDA's administration building expires in November. Besides rent, Nuclea also owes PEDA for some fees and expenses. PEDA is currently working on resolving that matter, Thurston said.

"They owe us a little bit of money," said Thurston, who declined to provide the exact amount due to the status of the negotiations.


"They vacated in good standing," he said.

Nuclea, which develops and commercializes diagnostic tests for prostate and breast cancer, diabetes and other metabolic syndromes, originally relocated its data center to Kellogg Street from another company location on South Street that has since closed.

It originally planned to use the facility to begin a bioinformatics research program with the Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts in North Adams. Bioinformatics is scientific work that draws information about human DNA and protein sequences using computers to analyze biological data.

The facility originally housed 10 Nuclea employees, but Thurston said only three workers were employed there when Nuclea left.

In January, Nuclea closed a Pittsfield lab and eliminated positions at company sites in both Pittsfield and Cambridge as part of a "major internal reorganization" designed to help the company focus "more fully" on the commercialization of its products.

"I didn't know it was coming," Thurston said, regarding Nuclea's decision to move out of PEDA's administration building. "I wasn't surprised at the reorganization. I thought this division would stay here, because I didn't think there was any value in pulling up stakes and relocating."

As a tenant in its 3,200-square-foot, 50-year-old administration building, PEDA originally had to amend its lease with GE to sublet roughly half of that space to Nuclea. Thurston isn't sure whether PEDA will seek another tenant at this point. PEDA's own lease with GE for the administration building also expires in November.

"We're not in the market to make rental deals," he said.

Plans call for PEDA to eventually move its administrative offices to the yet-to-be built Berkshire Innovation Center. If that happens, the 3.1-acre Kellogg Street location would be "a developable site of interest," Thurston said.

The highest ranking officer on Nuclea's website is Mary F. Lopez, who is listed as the company's chief operating officer and vice president of proteomics discovery, on the company's website. Lopez joined Nuclea last year as did the company's vice president of sales and marketing, William Creech.

In December, Nuclea's board appointed Muraca president and CEO of NanoDX, a development stage company in Albany, N.Y.

Contact Tony Dobrowolski at 413-496-6224.