Committee chairman U.S. Representative Darrell Issa (R-CA) (R) and ranking member Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD) (L) confer during a House Oversight and
Committee chairman U.S. Representative Darrell Issa (R-CA) (R) and ranking member Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD) (L) confer during a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on targeting of political groups seeking tax-exempt status from the IRS, on Capitol Hill in Washington, May 22, 2013. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters) (JONATHAN ERNST/)

Just three months ago, Lois G. Lerner, a senior official in the IRS's tax-exempt organizations division, publicly admitted that the agency targeted taxpayers because of their political beliefs. Until that point, despite years of inquiries from Congress, the IRS had continued to deny that it was targeting taxpayers, even though officials had long known about the conduct. With the truth out about the targeting of tea party groups, Lerner, then-acting Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Commissioner Steven Miller and even the president's own spokesman were quick to blame the entire episode on our front-line workers in Cincinnati.

Interview after interview of IRS employees by congressional investigators, however, began to expose the inconsistencies in the administration's narrative. There were no “rogue' agents, only employees who followed the implicit or explicit directions of more senior IRS officials in Washington. When Washington told Cincinnati IRS employees to “hold' other tea party cases while officials in Washington scrutinized early “