During Monday's "Cuts for Kids" event, All-Star Cuts barbershop owner Kevin Fye watched more than 100 Pittsfield children walk through the door of 148 First St. to receive a free back-to-school haircut. Sharon Johnson, pastor of the Our Fathers House of Restoration and We Care Outreach Ministries, which hosted the event, told The Eagle on Tuesday that Fye missed a golf tournament to continue cutting hair for a few hours after the event officially ended at 4 p.m., then offered vouchers for free haircuts on Tuesday.

"Now he's going to be part of our team," Johnson said. She said Fye will now be offering monthly "office hours" to give haircuts to kids who attended Monday's event "to help them keep up that good appearance," said Johnson.

Speaking of hairdos, a famous funnyman with an equally notable head of red hair was spotted at Guido's Fresh Marketplace in Pittsfield. Employees said television host Conan O'Brien stopped briefly to chat with them and pose for photos before going on his way. Hailing from eastern Massachusetts, the 51-year-old was born and raised in Brookline and went on to study American history at Harvard University, where he cut his teeth in comedy.

In other colorful news, in addition to new gallery openings, two local artists will debut installations Thursday night at the next DownStreet Art celebration in North Adams. Michael Chapman will present a window installation and Jarvis Rockwell will unveil two wall drawings.


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Chapman will create a wondrous window installation at 109 Main St., which will include clowns, taxidermy and found objects.

In art school, Chapman majored in printmaking, dance and mixology, and he later worked in assemblage of found objects before moving to Williamsburg, Brooklyn, N.Y., to play his part in the gentrification of the area. This led to museum preparation positions at Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (Mass MoCA) and the Williams College Museum of Art (WCMA), and then to self-employment at his Union Street business, Chapman Studio Frame and Crate.

Rockwell's wall drawings, located outside the CONcourse/DIScourse Gallery at 85 Main St., are three-dimensional works he will introduce at this week's DownStreet Art happening.

According to Rockwell, his wall drawings are his interpretation of a place between earth and heaven when we die -- a transitional space where our souls are floating up to a grander reality. As he explains it, "Death is the sloughing off of the three dimensional."

For more information about DownStreet Art events and the Berkshire Cultural Resource Center, go to www.downstreetart.org and www.mcla.edu/bcrc.

The fourth episode of the Boston Symphony Orchestra's new, summer-long behind-the-scenes Web series "New Tanglewood Tales: Backstage with Rising Artists," is now available at www.tanglewood.org/tales and www.youtube.com/bostonsymphony. "New Tanglewood Tales: Backstage with Rising Artists" spotlights the professional and personal lives of six fellows from the 2014 class of the Tanglewood Music Center, the BSO's prestigious summer music academy that takes place at Tanglewood. According to the BSO, the first two episodes, released this July, already have received more than 176,000 views.

In the fourth episode, flutist Masha Popova talks about the "flute stereotype" and spends time painting her nails with the rest of the TMC flute section. Jeffrey DeRoche explains the different categories of percussion and demonstrates the marimba. BSO Music Director Designate Andris Nelsons joins the Tanglewood Music Center Orchestra for rehearsals of Strauss' "Der Rosenkavalier" and talks about working with the ensemble, and some of the fellows weigh in on their experience working with Nelsons. The episode concludes with an excerpt of the July 12 gala performance with Nelsons.

County Fare, a weekly column featuring "tales from throughout the Berkshires," is compiled by Eagle staffers.