Architect Michael Fieldman is seen visiting the Kennedy Park Belvedere on June 1, 2012, the one-year anniversary of its  dedication. Fieldman commissioned
Architect Michael Fieldman is seen visiting the Kennedy Park Belvedere on June 1, 2012, the one-year anniversary of its dedication. Fieldman commissioned the belvedere as a tribute to his son. On Monday, a judge dismissed a lawsuit filed by a group of citizens seeking its removal. (Eagle file)

A Superior Court judge's dismissal of a lawsuit seeking the removal of the Kennedy Park Belvedere in Lenox may or may not put an end to this controversy that has roiled the town for two years but it should. It is past time to move on.

The monument on the park's southern overlook was dedicated in memory of Dr. Jordan Fieldman, a BMC physician and park enthusiast, who died of cancer in 2006. His father, New York architect Michael Fieldman, funded the $140,000 project, which was approved by town boards and was not found to be in violation of the Scenic Mountain Act. Obtaining belated approval from the Conservation Commission was a procedural problem that the town can learn from, but bringing a costly lawsuit against the town as did the 20 Lenox residents seeking the monument's removal was an overreaction.

The furor over the belvedere was an overreaction in the first place, as can be seen clearly two years later. It has now become part of the scenery and has not detracted from the appearance of the overlook, which in some ways looks better than it had previously.

The ruling by Judge Heidi Brieger of Suffolk County was not surprising, and there is no reason to believe a higher court will rule differently if the verdict is appealed. It would be wiser to let the wounds opened by the controversy heal.


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