Berkshires' first 2018 baby born to Sawtelles

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PITTSFIELD — The first baby born in Berkshire County in 2018 came with a few surprises.

The little boy born to Brenna and Jonathan Sawtelle, of Hindsdale, on Jan. 1, 2018, at the Berkshire Medical Center in Pittsfield was supposed to be born on Dec. 31 and he was supposed to weigh around 6 pounds.

But that's not what the yet-to-be-named cherub had in mind.

First, he wasn't going to be born anywhere near his scheduled time of delivery: 7 a.m. on Sunday. Working with their care providers, the Sawtelles had scheduled a delivery date three weeks before the regular nine-month gestation period would be up. Brenna, who is a phlebotomist at Berkshire Medical Center, was induced Sunday morning and gave birth more than 28 hours later, a bit after 11:30 a.m. on Monday, via cesarean section.

The first-time parents were expecting a tiny baby. Instead, the Sawtelles got a robust, 9-pound, 21-inch-long baby.

"I'm just so happy that he's healthy," said new mom Brenna, 21, from her hospital bed.

Jonathan, a 25-year-old truck driver, said the couple made it through the long labor with a lot of pacing.

The married couple have not chosen the baby's first name yet, though they know his middle and last name: Edward Sawtelle. Edward is Brenna's father's name.

"To end up with the gift of life at the beginning of the year — there's a lot of opportunity that he has in front of him," Jonathan said of his son. "People might see hope in it, with what he could do with his life."

"It starts the year with happiness," Brenna said.

Kristin Palpini can be reached at kpalpini@berkshireeagle.com and @kristinpalpini on Twitter.


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