Remaking the Greylock Mill: Floors to windows, the old mill is refashioned for residents and visitors

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PHOTO GALLERY | Greylock Works

NORTH ADAMS — More than 50,000 linear feet.

That's how much flooring — 3 1/2 inch-thick Douglas Fir, to be exact — the developer of the Greylock Mill has painstakingly restored in the eastern "weave shed" portion of the massive facility.

Salvatore Perry, of developer Latent Productions, provided an update to the city's Planning Board on Monday on the progress made in transforming the former manufacturing facility into a hub of hotel, event, and food production space — and detail what's next for the State Road project.

Perry and Karla Rothstein purchased the former Cariddi Mill, which dates back to the 19th century, in 2015. In the shorter, eastern side of the facility known as the "weave shed," all of the roof skylights have been replaced and 25 triple-pane windows on the south wall, encompassing the event space, have also been upgraded.

"We've spent enormous resources and time and effort replacing these roof skylights — beautiful structure, irreplaceable architecture," Perry said. The former cotton mill, built in 1804 and substantially expanded in 1870, operated from the early 1800s into the 1900s. The building also has served as an aluminum manufacturing facility, once housed a fine lace weaving operation and a wallpaper manufacturing firm. The sawtooth construction on part of the weave shed was designed to flood the space with light.

The crew removed a top layer of flooring — and the tens of thousands of nails that held it in place — that was impregnated with oil and found thick planks below.

"We developed a technique to remove debris and gunk that was between each plank," Perry said.

More than 2,000 holes, formerly used to anchor manufacturing equipment, were individually filled in the floor.

The refurbished floor was sealed with four applications of a natural coating made from a byproduct of cheesemaking.

The Greylock Mill has also begun to tackle some of the environmental issues at the site, including the removal of 20 above ground storage tanks, demolition of a blighted "dip tank area," and the abatement of asbestos in the boiler house on the southern side of the property.

"I'm very impressed, I will say that," said Planning Board Chairman Michael Leary. "I know it's got to be extraordinarily challenging to try to bring a building like that back to life — not just [because of] the scale and size of the building, but the age and the other things that go along with that."

Next up, the developer plans to replace the second half of the windows facing State Road in the weave shed. A new entryway will be installed in place of the former Cariddi Sales entrance on State Road, twice the width of the previous doors.

A loading dock on the south side of the weave shed will be repurposed.

Although not yet under construction, there are 79 rooms of multiple varieties planned for the hotel over 100,000 square feet of the mill's south wing.

"There's quite a variety of room types because we're looking to cater to a market segment that ranges from the Appalachian Trail hiker to families coming to visit the Berkshires for numerous days," Perry said.

The Planning Board unanimously approved the updates to the plan.

"You're clearly very dedicated," Leary said.

Reach staff writer Adam Shanks at 413-496-6376.


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