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On the FactCheck page, The Associated Press tracks down some of the most popular but completely untrue stories and visuals that were shared widely on social media. The AP takes those untrue stories, checks them out and sets the records straight in this weekly series of news articles.


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An erroneous tweet circulating on Twitter claims that 23,000 people used the same phone number to register to vote in North Dakota.

The tweet originally claimed that the voter registration occurred in North Carolina, but was updated in the replies to say North Dakota.

“Since North Dakota does not have voter registration, that would be false,” Secretary of State Al Jaeger told The Associated Press.

Despite claims otherwise that the Food and Drug Administration revealed that the COVID-19 vaccines are killing at least two people for every person they save, FDA experts did not say this, and they strongly refuted this false claim in an email to The Associated Press.

A faked CNN article reports that the Taliban banned menstrual hygiene products in Afghanistan, saying it goes against Shariah law. CNN did not publish such a story, and no credible reports can be found to support any such action by the Taliban.

Despite viral claims, a Shell oil platform did not break loose during Hurricane Ida. The U.S. Coast Guard conducted a flyover Aug. 29 that revealed no oil platforms had broken loose, according to an agency statement. Shell also performed its own flyover the next day and confirmed that its Mars, Olympus and Ursa platforms were “all intact and on location.”

The video does appear to show the Taliban using a Black Hawk helicopter that previously was used by the Afghan military, according to the markings on the aircraft. But despite viral claims, it shows not a killing, but a Taliban fighter trying to place a flag on a tall flagpole at the Kandahar governor’s office Aug. 29

Despite viral claims, Biden didn’t fall asleep during meeting with Israeli prime minister. During the 14-minute video taken of the meeting, he looks down at his lap several times, including when he is listening and reading from his notepad. The image is captured in one of these moments.

Despite viral claims, Pelosi was not caught on a hot mic saying "We don’t want him to talk." In the actual video, Pelosi did not respond, and the screen that showed her cut to a photo of Biden. The original video ends shortly after that.

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