LENOX — The School Committee voted unanimously Friday evening to offer the superintendent’s position in the district to Marc Gosselin, an educator and administrator in the 13,000-student North Penn School District outside Philadelphia. Committee Chairman Robert Vaughan said he planned to contact Gosselin with the offer immediately. As is customary, it is subject to successful contract negotiations, mutually agreeable and signed by both sides. Gosselin is also a leading finalist for superintendent of the larger Dover-Sherborn public school district west of Boston. That district’s next school committee meeting is on Tuesday night. Four of the seven Lenox School Committee members had voiced their preference for Beth Choquette, the other finalist interviewed at a lengthy meeting Tuesday night. Choquette, a North Adams native and current Cheshire resident, is an elementary school principal in Northampton. But on Friday, after a straw vote that turned the tide in Gosselin’s favor, the committee voted unanimously to offer him the post. Vaughan, a supporter of Gosselin, acknowledged that both candidates had done strong work on diversity and inclusion. “Either candidate would work for us,” he said, “but the depth of experience Marc has had goes beyond what Beth has.” Vaughan also noted that Choquette had given a great interview on Tuesday, “sharper in many ways than Marc’s. He’s a finalist in another district, I’m told he’s number one, so I don’t know if we’ll end up with him, but it would be unfortunate if we did not make the offer to him.” “I saw something special in Marc as a candidate,” said committee member Dr. Christine Mauro. “He’s very savvy and resourceful, with depth of thought, an active seeker of information on how we can grow and change. That’s a great quality for a superintendent.” She praised him as “outstanding,” citing his successful fund-raising effort to gain $100,000 from the community to support one of the suburban Philadelphia schools in his district facing a severe budget shortfall. Committee member Anne Marie O’Brien, initially in favor of Choquette, also supported Gosselin as the best candidate. O’Brien saluted interim Superintendent William Cameron for “leading us with such a study hand through an impossible time,” thanks to his extensive leadership experience. Committee member Molly Elliot cited both finalists as strong candidates as she voiced support for Gosselin, also a switch in her initial backing for Choquette. Member David Rimmler stated that either one would have his full backing, whatever the outcome of the vote. And Robert Munch, the committee vice-chairman and supporter of Gosselin, said he was pleased with what both candidates brought to the table. Francie Sorrentino, a longtime staffer at Lenox Memorial Middle and High School, had expressed firm support for Choquette, but joined “reluctantly” in the unanimous show of support for Gosselin. Sorrentino described Choquette as “a good fit for Lenox, she would mesh well and has community contacts to make my dream come true for vocational education. She has a warm, inviting personality and has a lot to offer.” Gosselin, a native of eastern Massachusetts, has been a principal and a central office curriculum supervisor for 13 elementary schools north of Philadelphia and currently is a special education supervisor. He is completing a doctorate at the University of Pennsylvania. Both finalists had received strong support from committee members following extended interviews on Tuesday evening, but they decided to defer a decision since the remote session was in its fourth hour. Gosselin urged a focus on the emotional well-being of students “in a very visible and vocal way.” “I think more play is important in schools,” he said. “Students need time to explore, socialize. We need to make sure we’re not losing the child in all our efforts to chase academic outcomes. … Kindness is important, joy is important, we want these places to be fun and engaging.” He also urged a focus on “making sure our curriculum is culturally relevant, sustaining and affirming for all students.” “The superintendent really is the chief storyteller of the district, so it’s important to demonstrate we’ve enhanced communication with the school board and the community at large,” Gosselin said.

LENOX — The School Committee voted unanimously Friday evening to offer the superintendent’s position in the district to Marc Gosselin, an educator and administrator in the 13,000-student North Penn School District outside Philadelphia.

Committee Chairman Robert Vaughan said he planned to contact Gosselin with the offer immediately. As is customary, it is subject to successful contract negotiations, mutually agreeable and signed by both sides.

Gosselin is also a leading finalist for superintendent of the larger Dover-Sherborn public school district west of Boston. That district’s next school committee meeting is on Tuesday night.

Four of the seven Lenox School Committee members had voiced their preference for Beth Choquette, the other finalist interviewed at a lengthy meeting Tuesday night. Choquette, a North Adams native and current Cheshire resident, is an elementary school principal in Northampton.

But on Friday, after a straw vote that turned the tide in Gosselin’s favor, the committee voted unanimously to offer him the post.

Vaughan, a supporter of Gosselin, acknowledged that both candidates had done strong work on diversity and inclusion. “Either candidate would work for us,” he said, “but the depth of experience Marc has had goes beyond what Beth has.”

Vaughan also noted that Choquette had given a great interview on Tuesday, “sharper in many ways than Marc’s. He’s a finalist in another district, I’m told he’s number one, so I don’t know if we’ll end up with him, but it would be unfortunate if we did not make the offer to him.”

“I saw something special in Marc as a candidate,” said committee member Dr. Christine Mauro. “He’s very savvy and resourceful, with depth of thought, an active seeker of information on how we can grow and change. That’s a great quality for a superintendent.”

She praised him as “outstanding,” citing his successful fund-raising effort to gain $100,000 from the community to support one of the suburban Philadelphia schools in his district facing a severe budget shortfall.

Committee member Anne Marie O’Brien, initially in favor of Choquette, also supported Gosselin as the best candidate.

O’Brien saluted interim Superintendent William Cameron for “leading us with such a study hand through an impossible time,” thanks to his extensive leadership experience.

Committee member Molly Elliot cited both finalists as strong candidates as she voiced support for Gosselin, also a switch in her initial backing for Choquette.

Member David Rimmler stated that either one would have his full backing, whatever the outcome of the vote. And Robert Munch, the committee vice-chairman and supporter of Gosselin, said he was pleased with what both candidates brought to the table.

Francie Sorrentino, a longtime staffer at Lenox Memorial Middle and High School, had expressed firm support for Choquette, but joined “reluctantly” in the unanimous show of support for Gosselin.

Sorrentino described Choquette as “a good fit for Lenox, she would mesh well and has community contacts to make my dream come true for vocational education. She has a warm, inviting personality and has a lot to offer.”

Gosselin, a native of eastern Massachusetts, has been a principal and a central office curriculum supervisor for 13 elementary schools north of Philadelphia and currently is a special education supervisor. He is completing a doctorate at the University of Pennsylvania.

Both finalists had received strong support from committee members following extended interviews on Tuesday evening, but they decided to defer a decision since the remote session was in its fourth hour.

Gosselin urged a focus on the emotional well-being of students “in a very visible and vocal way.”

“I think more play is important in schools,” he said. “Students need time to explore, socialize. We need to make sure we’re not losing the child in all our efforts to chase academic outcomes. … Kindness is important, joy is important, we want these places to be fun and engaging.”

He also urged a focus on “making sure our curriculum is culturally relevant, sustaining and affirming for all students.”

“The superintendent really is the chief storyteller of the district, so it’s important to demonstrate we’ve enhanced communication with the school board and the community at large,” Gosselin said.

Clarence Fanto can be reached at cfanto@yahoo.com, on Twitter

@BE_cfanto or at 413-637-2551.

Clarence Fanto can be reached at cfanto@yahoo.com, on Twitter @BE_cfanto or at 413-637-2551.