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    The Prince and Princess of Wales are making their first overseas trip since the death of Queen Elizabeth II in September. The trip that began Wednesday is an occasion for Prince William and his wife, Kate, to show the world as much about who they are not as who they are. With their three-day visit to Boston, the couple hope to demonstrate that they aren’t the last remnants of a dying institution. Their foray is focused on William’s initiative to find the next generation of environmental entrepreneurs and will be supplemented with trips to an anti-poverty program, child development researchers and local flood defenses.

      The Treasury Department says it has complied with a court order to make former President Donald Trump’s tax returns available to a congressional committee. The Supreme Court last week rejected Trump’s request for an order that would have prevented Treasury from giving six years of tax returns for Trump and some of his businesses to the Democratic-controlled House Ways and Means Committee. The court ended the three-year legal battle over disclosure of Trump’s tax returns. A department spokesperson said “Treasury has complied with last week’s court decision” but declined to say whether the committee had accessed the documents.

        Stocks rallied on Wall Street after the head of the Federal Reserve said the central bank could soon ease up on its aggressive pace of interest rate hikes aimed at taming inflation. While citing some signs that inflation is cooling, Fed Chair Jerome Powell stressed that the Fed will push rates higher than previously expected and keep them there for an extended period. The S&P 500 jumped 3.1% Wednesday. The tech-heavy Nasdaq rose 4.4% and the Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 2.2%. Treasury yields fell broadly and crude oil prices rose. Major indexes ended November with their second straight month of gains.

          Indiana’s Republican attorney general has asked the state medical licensing board to discipline an Indianapolis doctor who has spoken publicly about providing an abortion to a 10-year-old rape victim who traveled from Ohio after its more-restrictive abortion law took effect. The complaint alleges Dr. Caitlin Bernard violated state law by not reporting the girl’s child abuse to Indiana authorities and violated patient privacy laws by telling a reporter about the girl’s treatment. That account sparked a national political uproar in the weeks after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade in June. Bernard maintains the girl’s abuse had already been reported to Ohio police before the doctor ever saw the child.

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