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AP
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America sizzled through some hot nights last month, enough to make history. Federal meteorologists say the Lower 48 states in July set a record for overnight warmth. The average overnight temperature for the continental United States in July was 63.6 degrees, which is the highest in 128 years of recordkeeping. This matters because cooler temperatures overnight are crucial for people, animals and plants to recover from the warmth of daytime heat waves. In the U.S., the nighttime is warming faster than the daytime. Climate scientists say that's a signature of human-caused global warming.

AP
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A federal judge has reinstated a moratorium on coal leasing from federal lands that was imposed under former President Barack Obama and then scuttled under former President Donald Trump. Friday’s ruling from U.S. District Judge Brian Morris requires government officials to complete a new environmental review of the leasing program before they can resume coal sales. It marks a major setback for the already struggling coal industry. Few leases were sold in recent years as coal demand shrank drastically. But coal from existing leases remains a major contributor of planet-warming emissions. The industry’s opponents had urged Morris to revive the moratorium to ensure coal can’t make a comeback as climate change worsens.

AP
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Africa’s national parks, home to thousands of wildlife species such as lions, elephants and buffaloes, are increasingly threatened by from below-average rainfall and new infrastructure projects, stressing habitats and the species that rely on them. A prolonged drought in much of the continent’s east, exacerbated by climate change, and large-scale developments, including oil drilling and livestock grazing, are hampering conservation efforts in protected areas, several environmental experts say. The parks not only protect flora and fauna but also act as natural carbon sinks — storing carbon dioxide emitted into the air and reducing the effects of global warming.

AP
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FILE - A rainbow forms in the mist at the top of the waterfalls in Murchison Falls National Park, northwest Uganda, on Feb. 22, 2020. Africa’s national parks, home to thousands of wildlife species are increasingly threatened by from below-average rainfall and new infrastructure projects, stressing habitats and the species that rely on them. Climate change and large-scale developments, including oil drilling and livestock grazing, are hampering conservation efforts in protected areas, several environmental experts say. (AP Photo, File)

AP
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FILE - A pair of hippopotamuses cool off in the Nile river near the waterfalls in Murchison Falls National Park, northwest Uganda, on Feb. 21, 2020. Africa’s national parks, home to thousands of wildlife species are increasingly threatened by from below-average rainfall and new infrastructure projects, stressing habitats and the species that rely on them. Climate change and large-scale developments, including oil drilling and livestock grazing, are hampering conservation efforts in protected areas, several environmental experts say. (AP Photo, File)

AP
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One year after a wind-whipped wildfire charred a craggy mountainside above Lone Pine, California, signs of life are slowly returning. Tiny clusters of white and purple wildflowers stand out against blackened trees. Green shoots of Horsetail as thin as yarn strands break from the ground below scorched branches. A fistful of new leaves emerges from within an incinerated stump. It’s the start of a long recovery. It's a cycle that’s being repeated more often across the West as climate change brings drier, hotter seasons and more fires. It can be five years before ground cover fully recovers, and hotter fires are killing more trees.

AP
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One year after a wind-fed wildfire charged across a craggy mountainside above Lone Pine, Calif., flashes of new vegetation growth can be seen emerging in this still-charred corner of the Inyo National Forest, on Wednesday, July 27, 2022. In the era of climate change, academics say the effects on wildfire recovery and forest regeneration can be significant. One 2018 study that looked at nearly 1,500 wildfire sites found that because of hotter and drier climates, fewer forests are returning to their pre-burn tree mix, and in some cases trees did not return at all. (AP Photo/Michael Blood)

AP
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Mexican artist Luis Manuel Velez retouches a mural painted on the facade of a municipal building in San Salvador, Mexico, Saturday, July 30, 2022. Murals being created in San Salvador and other small towns today have much in common with those created in the early 20th century: They encapsulate themes of war, injustice, and oppression — as well as 21st century issues such as climate change and violence against women. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)

AP
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The Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers are central arms of California's water system. But they are becoming too salty to use for some farmers and cities that rely on them as the state's punishing drought drags on. In dry times, less fresh water flows from the mountains through California's rivers and into an estuary known as the Delta. That means saltier water from the Pacific Ocean is able to push further into the system, which supplies water to millions of people and acres of farmland. The Delta's challenges foreshadow the risks to come for key water supplies from drought and sea level rise made worse by climate change.

AP
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A new study finds climate hazards aggravate 58% of known infection diseases in people. Monday's study shows how widespread the influence of extreme weather such as flooding, heat waves and drought is on human illnesses. The study looks at cases that already happened. Researchers calculate 286 unique sicknesses connected to what they call climate hazards. And of those illnesses, extreme weather made it worse in 223 maladies. The study doesn't do the calculations to formally attribute the diseases to climate change. But several scientists call it a terrifying illustration of climate change's effect on human health.