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FILE - In this Sunday, March 5, 2017 photo, Debbie Antonelli, center, a women's college basketball analyst for ESPN, talks with play-by-play announcer Beth Mowins, right, before the start of the women's basketball game between Duke and Notre Dame at the NCAA college basketball game in the championship of the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament at the HTC Center in Conway, S.C., Sunday, March 5, 2017. Some of the giants of women’s basketball say if not for Title IX, doors would not have been open for them to blaze trails to Hall of Fame careers on and off the court, but sound complacency alarms when it comes to future of the law. (AP Photo/Mic Smith, File)

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Debbie Ryan poses at the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame in Knoxville, Tenn., Saturday, June 11, 2022. Marsha Sharp, Ann Meyers Drysdale, Debbie Ryan and others all worked their way through the nascent days of Title IX to the heights of women’s basketball. (AP Photo/Teresa Walker)

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Marsha Sharp poses at the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame in Knoxville, Tenn., Saturday, June 11, 2022. Sharp says Title IX is the most impactful legislation of the 20th century. (AP Photo/Teresa Walker)

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FILE - Philip Baker Hall arrives at the premiere of "Clear History" at the Cinerama Dome on Wednesday, July 31, 2013 in Los Angeles. Hall, the prolific character actor of film and theater who starred in Paul Thomas Anderson’s early movies and who memorably hunted down a long-overdue library book in “Seinfeld,” has died. He was 90. Holly Wolfle Hall, the actor’s wife of nearly 40 years, says Hall died Sunday surrounded by loved ones in Glendale, California. (Photo by Dan Steinberg/Invision/AP, File)

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Dottie Pepper recalls being paired with Meg Mallon for the final round of the 1991 U.S. Women’s Open with what she viewed as an impressive $110,000 first-place prize on the line. Things have changed, but Lydia Ko says not enough. Mallon would win that title in 1991, collecting the first six-figure payout in women’s golf history. Pepper says, “That was a big deal.” Three decades later, Pepper can hardly comprehend that the top female golfers in the world will be competing this week for a record $10 million purse. That includes a winner’s take of $1.8 million at the U.S. Women’s Open at Pine Needles. Ko, the No. 3-ranked women’s golfer in the world, said she’s grateful for steps toward equal pay but added “there’s still a ways to go.”