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AP
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Cotton is harvested on the farm of Billie D Simpson, Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2021, in San Benito, Texas. Across the Rio Grande Valley, a multimillion-dollar crop industry and fast-growing cities get water from an irrigation system designed nearly a century ago for agriculture. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

AP
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The sun rises over a channel, known locally as a resaca , in San Benito, Texas, Saturday, Sept. 25, 2021. Canals used to deliver water in many parts of the Rio Grande Valley lose anywhere from 10% to 40% of the water they carry to seepage and evaporation, according to the Texas Water Development Board, making water a growing concern amid climate change and rising demand that scientists predict will lead to water shortages in the region by 2060.(AP Photo/Eric Gay)

AP
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Cameron County Irrigation District #2 pump station supervisor George Diego, walks past a measuring site, Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2021, in San Benito, Texas. Earlier this year, before rain soaked the Rio Grande Valley in May and June, several sugarcane farmers in Irrigation District #2 were told they could only be provided one delivery of water — far less than what the thirsty crop requires. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

AP
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Sugarcane farmer Sam Simmons examines a stalk at his ranch in San Benito, Texas, Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2021. Earlier this year, before rain soaked the Rio Grande Valley in May and June, several sugarcane farmers in Irrigation District #2 were told they could only be provided one delivery of water — far less than what the thirsty crop requires. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

AP
  • Updated

Sugarcane farmer Sam Simmons at his ranch in San Benito, Texas, Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2021. Earlier this year, before rain soaked the Rio Grande Valley in May and June, several sugarcane farmers in Irrigation District #2 were told they could only be provided one delivery of water — far less than what the thirsty crop requires. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

AP
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A construction worker helps frame a new home, Friday, Sept. 17, 2021, in McAllen, Texas. As the population of the Rio Grande Valley swells, its water supply is facing distinct challenges. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

AP
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Sugarcane farmer Sam Simmons, left, and Sonia Lambert, General Manager of Cameron County Irrigation District #2, right, visit a site on his property being irrigated, Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2021, in San Benito, Texas. Earlier this year, before rain soaked the Rio Grande Valley in May and June, several sugarcane farmers in Irrigation District #2 were told they could only be provided one delivery of water — far less than what the thirsty crop requires.(AP Photo/Eric Gay)

AP
  • Updated

The sun sets over a canal, Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2021, in McAllen, Texas. Canals used to deliver water in many parts of the Rio Grande Valley lose anywhere from 10% to 40% of the water they carry to seepage and evaporation, according to the Texas Water Development Board, making water a growing concern amid climate change and rising demand that scientists predict will lead to water shortages in the region by 2060. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

AP
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Tomas De Leon, foreman of the Hidalgo County Irrigation District #3 pump station, walks along a canal that feeds water from the Rio Grande, Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2021, in Hidalgo, Texas. Under a 1944 treaty, Mexico and the U.S. share water from the Rio Grande for use in agriculture, industries and households. Since then, the border cities of McAllen, Brownsville, Reynosa and Matamoros have ballooned — along with their water needs. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

AP
  • Updated

Cotton is harvested on the farm of Billie D Simpson, Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2021, in San Benito, Texas. Across the Rio Grande Valley, a multimillion-dollar crop industry and fast-growing cities get water from an irrigation system designed nearly a century ago for agriculture. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)