Search / 12 results found

from
to
AP
  • Updated

Chris Levesque, president and CEO of TerraPower, a company developing and building small nuclear reactors, displays a fuel assembly model, Thursday, Jan. 13, 2022, in Everett, Wash. The 5-foot model is about one-third actual length and would be vertical when in use, rather than horizontal. By cooling the reactor with liquid sodium, a metal that solidifies at well above room temperature, TerraPower says its relatively small, 345-megawatt plant will be safe and less expensive than conventional, water-cooled nuclear plants. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

AP
  • Updated

FILE - Three of Deepwater Wind's five turbines stand in the water off Block Island, R.I, the nation's first offshore wind farm on Aug. 15, 2016. As climate change pushes states in the U.S. to dramatically cut their use of fossil fuels, many are coming to the conclusion that solar, wind and other renewable power sources won't be enough to keep the lights on. Nuclear power is emerging as an answer to fill the gap as states transition away from coal, oil and natural gas to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and stave off the worst effects of a warming planet. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)

AP
  • Updated

TerraPower's Michael Anderson, manager of test engineers and technicians, talks about the large periodic table on the wall overhead during a tour of the nuclear reactor development facility, Thursday, Jan. 13, 2022, in Everett, Wash. TerraPower plans to make its plant useful for today's energy grid with ever more renewable power. A salt heat "battery" will allow a nuclear plant to ramp up electricity production on demand, offsetting dips in electricity when the wind isn't blowing and sun isn't shining. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

AP
  • Updated

A canister containing an ingot of sodium metal is opened at TerraPower, a company developing and building small nuclear reactors, Thursday, Jan. 13, 2022, in Everett, Wash. By cooling a reactor with liquid sodium, a metal that solidifies at well above room temperature, TerraPower says its relatively small, 345-megawatt nuclear plant will be safe and less expensive than conventional, water-cooled nuclear plants. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

AP
  • Updated

TerraPower's Michael Anderson, manager of test engineers and technicians, stands in front of sodium loops used to test instruments during a tour of the nuclear reactor development facility, Thursday, Jan. 13, 2022, in Everett, Wash. TerraPower plans to make its plant useful for today's energy grid with ever more renewable power. A salt heat "battery" will allow a nuclear plant to ramp up electricity production on demand, offsetting dips in electricity when the wind isn't blowing and sun isn't shining. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

AP
  • Updated

Chris Levesque, president and CEO of TerraPower, a company developing and building small nuclear reactors, displays a fuel assembly model, Thursday, Jan. 13, 2022, in Everett, Wash. The 5-foot model is about one-third actual length and would be vertical when in use, with the uranium fuel inside and sodium flowing on the outside of the tubes. By cooling the reactor with liquid sodium, a metal that solidifies at well above room temperature, TerraPower says its relatively small, 345-megawatt plant will be safe and less expensive than conventional, water-cooled nuclear plants. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

AP
  • Updated

TerraPower's Michael Anderson, manager of test engineers and technicians, holds a glass jar holding purified salt during a tour of the nuclear reactor development facility, Thursday, Jan. 13, 2022, in Everett, Wash. TerraPower plans to make its plant useful for today's energy grid with ever more renewable power. A salt heat "battery" will allow a nuclear plant to ramp up electricity production on demand, offsetting dips in electricity when the wind isn't blowing and sun isn't shining. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)