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AP
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New relief supplies rolled into eastern Afghanistan after this week's powerful earthquake that state media said killed at least 1,150. Residents worried about how to rebuild before the harsh winter sets in, only a few months away in the mountainous region. Wednesday's quake hit one of the poorest corners of Afghanistan, a country already hollowed out by increasing poverty. Thousands were left homeless or injured. New planeloads of relief supplies arrived Saturday from Pakistan and other countries, and aid groups distributed  food, medical supplies and other items.

AP
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An aftershock has taken more lives and threatened to pile even more misery on an area of eastern Afghanistan reeling from a powerful earthquake that state media said killed 1,150 people this week. Wednesday’s magnitude 6 quake killed 121 children when it struck a remote, mountainous region already grappling with staggering poverty. It comes at a time when the country as a whole is spiraling deeper into economic crisis after many countries pulled back critical financing and development aid in the wake of the Taliban takeover. Pakistan’s Meteorological Department reported a new, 4.2 magnitude quake on Friday. In Afghanistan, the state-run Bakhtar News Agency reported it took five more lives in the hard-hit Gayan district.

AP
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Villagers rushed to bury the dead and dug by hand through the rubble of homes in search of survivors after a devastating earthquake in eastern Afghanistan. Residents appeared to be largely on their own Thursday to deal with the aftermath as their new Taliban-led government and the international aid community struggled to help. State media said Wednesday’s quake killed 1,000 people. An independent U.N. court said around 770 people had been killed in Paktika and Khost provinces. It's unclear how either sum was tallied given the difficulty of accessing or communicating with the affected areas, but the devastation was clear. Under a leaden sky, men dug several long trenches on a mountainside overlooking their village to bury the dead.

AP
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Volunteer drivers are risking everything to deliver humanitarian aid to Ukrainians behind the front lines of the war — and to help many of them escape. The routes are dangerous and long and the drivers risk detention, injury or death. Ukrainian activists say more than two dozen drivers have been detained and held for more than two months by Russian-backed separatists in the Donetsk region. In Donetsk and the Luhansk region, vans and minibuses of volunteers zip through towns and down country roads, racing to evacuate civilians as artillery shells whistle through the air. Russian forces are doubling down on their offensive in the regions.

AP
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No mother should have to lose her child. Owliyo Hassan Salaad has watched four die this year. A drought in the Horn of Africa has taken them, one by one. Deaths have begun in the region’s most parched drought in four decades. Previously unreported data shared with The Associated Press show nearly 450 deaths this year at malnutrition treatment centers in Somalia alone. Authorities are now shifting to the grim task of trying to prevent famine. Drought comes and goes. But this is one like no other. Humanitarian aid is sapped by global crises like COVID-19 and now Russia's war in Ukraine.

AP
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Two U.N. food agencies are warning of multiple, looming food crises on the planet. Climate “shocks” including droughts and flooding, the repercussions of the COVID-19 pandemic and the war in Ukraine were cited as why food and fuel prices were rising so rapidly. The stark warning was issued jointly Monday in a report by the World Food Program and the Food and Agriculture Organization. WFP Executive Director David Beasley said besides hurting “the poorest of the poor,” the global food crisis threatens to overwhelm millions of families who are just getting by. The report said six nations faced catastrophic conditions: Ethiopia, Nigeria, South Sudan, Yemen, Afghanistan and Somalia.

AP
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Families across Africa are paying about 45% more for wheat flour as Russia's war in Ukraine blocks exports from the Black Sea. Some countries like Somalia get more than 90% of their wheat from Russia and Ukraine. That's forcing many people to substitute wheat for other grains. But the United Nations is warning that the price hikes are coming as many parts of Africa are facing drought and hunger. The U.N. already had warned that an estimated 13 million people were already facing severe hunger in the wider Horn of Africa region as a result of a persistent drought. The World Food Program chief say's Russia's war on Ukraine is “piling catastrophe on top of catastrophe” for the world's poor.