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AP
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FILE - In this Friday, May 21, 2021 file photo, Col. Lamar Davis, superintendent of the Louisiana State Police, speaks about the agency's release of video involving the death of Ronald Greene, at a press conference in Baton Rouge, La. Greene was jolted with stun guns, put in a chokehold and beaten by troopers, and his death is now the subject of a federal civil rights investigation. Davis has reorganized his staff, overhauled use-of-force policies and mandated all troopers attend training on intrinsic bias. But he acknowledged it may not be enough to stave off growing calls for a U.S. Justice Department “pattern and practice” probe of potential racial profiling by a nearly 1,000-trooper force that’s more than three-quarters white men. (AP Photo/Melinda Deslatte)

AP
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Former Louisiana State Police Trooper Carl Cavalier holds his uniform at his home in Houma, La. on Friday, Oct. 15, 2021. Cavalier, a Black state trooper who was once decorated for valor but recently fired in part for criticizing the agency’s handling of brutality cases, says, “If you’re a part of the good ol’ boy system, there’s no wrong you can do. (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed)

AP
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FILE - This Wednesday, Aug. 4, 2021 file photo shows the front of Louisiana State Police Troop F headquarters in Monroe, La. As the Louisiana State Police reel from a sprawling federal investigation into the deadly 2019 arrest of Black motorist Ronald Greene and other beating cases, dozens of current and former troopers tell The Associated Press of an entrenched culture at the agency of impunity, nepotism and in some cases outright racism. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

AP
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Former Louisiana State Police Trooper Carl Cavalier holds the Medal of Valor he was awarded for an action in New Orleans, at his home in Houma, La. on Friday, Oct. 15, 2021. Cavalier, a Black state trooper who was recently fired in part for criticizing the agency’s handling of brutality cases, says, “If you’re a part of the good ol’ boy system, there’s no wrong you can do. (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed)

AP
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Former Louisiana State Police Trooper Carl Cavalier stands next to a poster he received when he graduated from the state police academy in 2015, at his home in Houma, La. on Friday, Oct. 15, 2021. Cavalier, who went through the same class with Jacob Brown, described him as “untouchable.” “A select few cadets in the academy carried themselves with a certain swagger, a vibe that said they were sure they’d make it through,” Cavalier said. “They didn’t have any doubts.” (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed)

AP
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W. Lloyd Grafton, a former federal officer, past member of the Louisiana State Police Commission and an expert court consultant on police use of force, pauses during an interview at his home in Ruston, La. “There’s a corruption that allows the reprobates in state police to just sort of do as they damn well please,” says Grafton, who is consulting on the Ronald Greene family’s civil case. “Nobody holds them accountable.” (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed)

AP
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FILE - This May 10, 2019, file photo, provided by the Louisiana State Police shows blood stains on the shield and uniform of Master Trooper Chris Hollingsworth, in West Monroe, La., after troopers punched, dragged and stunned Black motorist Ronald Greene during his fatal 2019 arrest. (Louisiana State Police via AP, File)

AP
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FILE - In this Friday, Sept. 25, 2020, file photo, troopers of the Louisiana State Police gather at the burial site of Master Trooper Chris Hollingsworth, in West Monroe, La. Hollingsworth died in a single-car crash hours after he learned he had been fired for his role in the in-custody death of Ronald Greene. As the Louisiana State Police reel from a sprawling federal investigation into the deadly 2019 arrest of Greene, a Black motorist, and other beating cases, dozens of current and former troopers tell The Associated Press of an entrenched culture at the agency of impunity, nepotism and in some cases outright racism. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)