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Fans will have a chance to say goodbye to Naomi Judd, the late matriarch of the Grammy-winning country duo The Judds, on a tour starting Friday. The Judd family continues to grieve her sudden death on April 30 only weeks after the tour was announced. Wynonna Judd, who will helm the 11-city tour starting Friday, called it "devastatingly beautiful" to relive her memories of her mom during the tour. Daughter Ashley Judd recalled her mother's compassion and desire to learn, as well as her efforts to reduce the stigma of mental health. The family hopes that fans will be uplifted by her legacy of music and advocacy.

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States around the country are making it easier for newborn moms to keep Medicaid in the year after childbirth, a crucial time when depression and other health problems can develop. But tight government budgets and low reimbursement may ultimately limit this push and make it hard for patients who get expanded coverage to find doctors willing to take it. Since the spring, 23 states and Washington, D.C., have said they will extend the government-funded coverage for 12 months after babies arrive. That’s up from a requirement to keep it for only 60 days, after which many women lose coverage.

AP
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This undated photo provided by Misty Castillo shows her son, Arcadio Castillo III, at a relative's house in Woodburn, Ore. One summer night, Misty Castillo stepped out of her house in Salem, Ore., called 911 and asked for the police, saying her son was mentally ill, was assaulting her and her husband and had a knife. Less than five minutes later, a police officer burst into the house and shot Arcadio Castillo III dead. (Misty Castillo via AP)

AP
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People experiencing mental health crises have been being killed by police in America. But how many is unknown. Federal law requires the Department of Justice to collect and publish data on that. But the law doesn’t require police departments to tell the DOJ how many people their officers killed, and many aren't doing so. The National Alliance on Mental Illness says the killings highlight a larger systemic problem in helping people who are struggling with their mental health or are in crisis. Two killings, in Oregon and West Virginia, show how system failures had tragic results.

AP
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People experiencing mental health crises have been being killed by police in America. But how many is unknown. Federal law requires the Department of Justice to collect and publish data on that. But the law doesn’t require police departments to tell the DOJ how many people their officers killed, and many aren’t doing so. The National Alliance on Mental Illness says the killings highlight a larger systemic problem in helping people who are struggling with their mental health or are in crisis. Two killings, in Oregon and West Virginia, show how system failures had tragic results.

AP
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Misty Castillo, left, and her husband Arcadio stand in front of their home, holding the urn containing the ashes of their son Arcadio Castillo III, who was shot in 2021 by Salem police, as their granddaughter Nala, age 2, looks out the window in Salem, Ore., Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022. Misty called 911 and asked for the police, saying her son was mentally ill, was assaulting her and her husband and had a knife. Less than five minutes later, a police officer burst into the house and shot him. (AP Photo/Craig Mitchelldyer)

AP
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Misty Castillo, left, and her husband Arcadio stand in front of their home, holding the urn containing the ashes of their son Arcadio Castillo III, who was shot in 2021 by Salem police, in Salem, Ore., Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022. Misty called 911 and asked for the police, saying her son was mentally ill, was assaulting her and her husband and had a knife. Less than five minutes later, a police officer burst into the house and shot him. (AP Photo/Craig Mitchelldyer)

AP
  • Updated

Arcadio Castillo, left, and his wife Misty stand in front of their home, holding the urn containing the ashes of their son Arcadio Castillo III, who was shot in 2021 by Salem police, in Salem, Ore., Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022. Misty called 911 and asked for the police, saying her son was mentally ill, was assaulting her and her husband and had a knife. Less than five minutes later, a police officer burst into the house and shot Arcadio Castillo III. (AP Photo/Craig Mitchelldyer)