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AP
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Lisa Ciecko, a Seattle Parks and Recreation plant ecologist, looks at a tree on Friday, Oct. 7, 2022, in Seattle. Cities across the world have promised to plant more carbon-absorbing trees to help fight climate change. Research has shown the shade of mature trees also helps reduce unhealthful “heat islands,” especially in poor neighborhoods.(AP Photo/Stephen Brashear)

AP
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Washington Park Arboretum arborist Shea Cope, uses a website to look up knobcone pine, one of many stressed trees in the arboretum, on Friday, Oct. 7, 2022, in Seattle. Increasingly, the challenge for city arborists is to keep old and new trees alive, and it's incurring a bigger hit on municipal budgets. (AP Photo/Stephen Brashear)

AP
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A stressed western red cedar loaded with seed pods is visible, on Friday, Oct. 7, 2022, in Seattle. Increasingly, the challenge for city arborists is to keep old and new trees alive, and it's incurring a bigger hit on municipal budgets. (AP Photo/Stephen Brashear)

AP
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Lisa Ciecko, a Seattle Parks and Recreation plant ecologist, removes a temperature sensor that measures heat in an urban forest, on Friday, Oct. 7, 2022, in Seattle. Human-caused climate change fuels more extreme weather such as intense wind, rain and freezing temperatures that can kill or stress city trees. (AP Photo/Stephen Brashear)

AP
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Washington Park Arboretum arborist Shea Cope is pictured, on Friday, Oct. 7, 2022, in Seattle. Cities across the world have promised to plant more carbon-absorbing trees to help fight climate change. “We’re losing conifers faster than our broad leaf, deciduous ones,” Cope added as he surveyed a towering knobcone pine with half its canopy dead. (AP Photo/Stephen Brashear)

AP
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A blue fungus is visible, on Friday, Oct. 7, 2022, in Seattle, in the stump of a Japanese red pine that was killed by bark beetles. Cities across the world have promised to plant more carbon-absorbing trees to help fight climate change. (AP Photo/Stephen Brashear)

AP
  • Updated

Lisa Ciecko, a Seattle Parks and Recreation plant ecologist, removes a temperature sensor that measures heat in an urban forest, on Friday, Oct. 7, 2022, in Seattle. Human-caused climate change fuels more extreme weather such as intense wind, rain and freezing temperatures that can kill or stress city trees. (AP Photo/Stephen Brashear)

AP
  • Updated

A broad leaf maple loaded with seed pods is visible, on Friday, Oct. 7, 2022, in Seattle. Cities across the world have promised to plant more carbon-absorbing trees to help fight climate change. (AP Photo/Stephen Brashear)

AP
  • Updated

Earth Corps international member Vanessa Ndikontar plants a tree in a restored area of Arbor Lake Park in Burien, Wash., Oct 27, 2022. The planting and restoration are part of the city’s efforts to increase its tree canopy. (AP Photo/Manuel Valdes)