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Glowing lava from the world’s largest volcano is a sight to behold, but for many Native Hawaiians, Mauna Loa’s eruption is a time to pray, make offerings and honor both the natural and spiritual worlds. An eruption of a volcano like Mauna Loa has a deep yet very personal cultural significance for many Native Hawaiians. It can be an opportunity to feel a connection with creation itself through the way lava gives birth to new land, as well as a time to reflect on their own place in the world and the people who came before them.

AP
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The spectacle of incandescent lava spewing from Hawaii's Mauna Loa has drawn thousands of visitors and is turning into a tourism boon for a Big Island town near the world’s largest volcano. Some hotels in and around Hilo are becoming fully booked in what is normally a slower time of the year for business. Helicopter tours of Mauna Loa, which began erupting Sunday after being quiet for 38 years, are also in high demand by tourists and journalists. Hawaii's travel industry normally falls off this time of year between the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays.

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The last-minute decision to ban the sale of beer at World Cup stadiums in Qatar is the latest example of some of the tensions that have played out ahead of the tournament. Qatari officials have for long said they were eager to welcome everybody but that visitors should also respect their culture and traditions. Alcohol consumption, forbidden in Islam, is one of the areas where Qatar has been attempting to strike a delicate balance. Some Islamic countries, like Saudi Arabia, outlaw alcohol. But alcohol is available in some other Muslim nations though regulations vary widely and there can be intricate rules and restrictions on its sale.

AP
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A senior Human Rights Watch official slammed the Egyptian government’s human and environmental rights record, saying that the space for environmental activism in Egypt “is severely curtailed.” Richard Pearshouse, director of environment and human rights at HRW, said environmental activists in Egypt have faced “constant harassment” by security forces including restrictions on travel, foreign funding, and research permits. He said that such restrictions bar public debate and research on damages caused by business, agro-industry, cement factories and other businesses linked to the military.

AP
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The struggle for affordable housing is playing out in Vail, Colorado, where the owners of a ski resort are trying to create an affordable housing complex for the chefs, bus drivers, ski lift operators and other workers who keep the resort humming. The problem? A group of bighorn sheep live on a fraction of the land designated for the project. The years-long dispute is nowhere close to being solved, and it's leading local businesses to have a tough time recruiting workers to keep local businesses afloat.

AP
  • Updated

The struggle for affordable housing is playing out in Vail, Colorado, where the owners of a ski resort are trying to create an affordable housing complex for the chefs, bus drivers, ski lift operators and other workers who keep the resort humming. The problem? A group of bighorn sheep live on a fraction of the land designated for the project. The years-long dispute is nowhere close to being solved, and it’s leading local businesses to have a tough time recruiting workers to keep local businesses afloat.

AP
  • Updated

The dozens of world leaders and other dignitaries traveling to Bali for the G-20 summit will be drawing a welcome spotlight on the revival of the tropical island's ailing tourism sector. Bali's economy is on the mend but it's still drawing only a third of the travelers who used to arrive here before the pandemic. It got through a two-year closure to foreign travelers by wooing domestic tourists happy to take advantage of pandemic discounts. But many working in the tourism sector still lost their livelihoods. Now that quarantines and other restrictions have ended, the island is trying to draw more digital nomads and other well-heeled travelers, hoping to build a stronger foundation for Bali's economy.

AP
  • Updated

French officials say an Iranian man who lived for 18 years in Paris’ Charles de Gaulle Airport and loosely inspired the Steven Spielberg film “The Terminal” has died in the airport. Mehran Karimi Nasseri died Saturday after a heart attack in the airport’s Terminal 2F. That's according to official with the Paris airport authority, who said police and then a medical team treated him but were not able to save him. Karimi Nasseri, believed to have been born in 1945, lived in the airport’s Terminal 1 from 1988 until 2006, first in legal limbo because he lacked residency papers and later by choice, according to French media. The airport official said Karimi Nasseri had been living in the airport again in recent weeks.