Secretary tours culvert sites targeted for upgrades with state grants (copy)

Last month, Energy and Environmental Affairs Secretary Kathleen Theoharides told state budget writers that the Municipal Vulnerability Preparedness grant program had enrolled 89 percent of all municipalities but will not be able to keep up with the funding necessary to address climate adaptation.

Cities and towns can now apply for the next round of planning grants to help them identify climate hazards, assess vulnerabilities and develop action plans focused on climate change resilience.

The Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs is now accepting proposals for the Municipal Vulnerability Preparedness Program, which provides support to help communities become more resilient to climate change. Planning grant applications must be received by June 4, while action grant applications are due by 2 p.m. May 7.

Additional information is available on the Municipal Vulnerability Preparedness program website. Communities that have already received a planning grant and been designated as an MVP program municipality are eligible to submit proposals for action grants, which provide funding for local projects developed during the planning process. According to the Metropolitan Area Planning Council, proposals that emphasize conservation, nature-based solutions and community engagement are preferred.

Last month, Energy and Environmental Affairs Secretary Kathleen Theoharides told state budget writers that the MVP grant program had enrolled 89 percent of all municipalities but will not be able to keep up with the funding necessary to address climate adaptation.

For the most recent round, she said, the program got $45 million worth of requests and had just $10.45 million to allocate.