Great Barrington police officer pleads not guilty in OUI case

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GREAT BARRINGTON — A town police officer accused of driving drunk on the Massachusetts Turnpike last month pleaded not guilty in court Monday.

Wearing a blue suit, Daniel Bartini, 26, appeared before Judge Paul Vrabel in Southern Berkshire District Court to answer to a charge of driving under the influence of liquor. Bartini was released on personal recognizance.

Bartini did not attend his initial arraignment date on April 29 because he was in rehabilitation immediately after the April 27 incident in Otis, town police Chief William Walsh told The Eagle at the time.

Town officials said they cannot comment on Bartini's employment status since his arrest, citing privacy laws for personnel matters.

Bartini, who was off-duty, was pulled over by a Massachusetts State Police trooper. Bartini was driving west on the Turnpike at 5:40 p.m., according to the arrest report.

The trooper's report said Bartini failed a field sobriety test and refused to take a Breathalyzer. Bartini refused to produce his license and registration, the report says.

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State police said they pulled Bartini over because they had received calls from drivers reporting a blue pickup truck speeding, moving erratically and nearly colliding with their vehicles.

Vrabel set Bartini's first pretrial court date for June 27. Bartini was released on personal recognizance.

It isn't the first alcohol-related traffic stop for Bartini.

In 2016, he was pulled over by a Sheffield police officer who reported that Bartini was driving erratically, and that he and his passenger appeared intoxicated.

Bartini was not subjected to tests or issued a citation, and police allowed the pair to be picked up by another Great Barrington police officer and driven home, which set off an investigation by the town of Sheffield.

Citing privacy laws, Great Barrington officials would not disclose any information about disciplinary action taken against Bartini, but said all officers would have to complete an alcohol training course.

Heather Bellow can be reached at hbellow@berkshireeagle.com or on Twitter @BE_hbellow and 413-329-6871.


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